Horticultural Society’s support the latest boost to Vic High garden

Photo: Victoria Horticultural Society president Margaret Hantiuk (from left), joins gardening enthusiasts and Vic High students Kiara Chesson and Eden Murray in the school’s vegetable and herb garden next to the greenhouse. The society helped out the school’s gardening efforts recently with a $500 donation. Photo contributed

Gardening project as much about education as it is about providing food

When Victoria High School students get their lunch at the school cafeteria, it’s likely that at least some of the food they enjoy will have come from their own garden.

It’s a program that recently caught the attention of Victoria Horticultural Society (V.H.S.) members, who have reached into their own resources to help the school’s garden grow.

“We’re the oldest gardening club in Victoria, and when we looked at what the young people at Victoria High were doing, we knew this was something we wanted to support,” said society president Margaret Hantiuk.

“Food security is a growing concern in Victoria and we took a look at how this program is growing food that’s consumed right on site and knew it was a program we wanted to support.”

The society’s $500 donation will be used to purchase seeds, tools and materials for the upcoming growing season. READ MORE

Feb. 10, 2018
www.saanichnews.com

Related Posts

Filter Blog Posts by Tags

F2CC on Facebook

3 days ago

## A new resource developed by Native Farm to School and First Nations Development InstituteThe ***Native Farm to School Guide: Connecting Traditional Foods, Stories, Language, and Community*** focuses on what food sovereignty can look like inside community education and school systems.It identifies best practices, lessons learned, biggest challenges and case studies of successful programs. **Download the guide here 👉 tinyurl.com/3e2pp6rb****#farm2school #nativefarm2school #indigenous #indigenousfoodsovereignty #indigenousfoodways** ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook

7 days ago

Who knew building a root cellar could be this simple?You really don't need anything elaborate to successfully store winter vegetables. We built our Root Cellar entirely with materials that were close at hand. Cedar logs form the walls and ceiling. A repurposed pool liner covers the roof. Soil from a landscaping project was used to enclose the whole structure. Twenty bags of leaves provide insulation around the doorway which is a surplus piece of galvanized metal lath purposed to keep out critters. In spring the leaves get turned into the soil to grow more vegetables. ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook