Report on the Forum on Food Security and Nutrition among First Nations Communities in New Brunswick

NOURISHING FOOD, NOURISHING KNOWLEDGE Report on the Forum on Food Security and Nutrition among First Nations Communities in New Brunswick

First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) are among Canada’s most vulnerable populations and face a unique set of challenges related to nutritious food access, availability and use compared to the majority of Canadians. As a consequence, FNMI are at a much higher risk of household food insecurity. For the past 19 years, Canadian Feed The Children (CFTC) has been working in partnership with First Nations communities and schools with a focus on ensuring consistent, universal access to nutritious food for children in all partner schools and communities.

CFTC’s vision and long-term goal for its work in Canada is to support sustainable food systems that ensure women and men in First Nations communities have the tools and resources to strengthen the nutrition status of their children and families. This is being achieved through school food programs, which provide a strong foundation on which to build relationships and develop trust with community members for broader community engagement on healthy living.

Click here to read the full report.

November, 2014
Canadian Feed the Children

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